ByAmy Kaplan, writer at Creators.co
Lead Staff Writer // Follow me on Twitter and Instagram @PhotoAmy33
Amy Kaplan

The Nevada Athletic Commission has ruled on Conor McGregor's punishment for his involvement in the water bottle throwing incident that occurred between he and Nate Diaz at the UFC 202 press conference, but Diaz has yet to go before the NAC, as his hearing was postponed.

The incident:

Many were looking at how the commission handled sentencing McGregor as a benchmark for how Diaz might be punished, but I don't think it will be comparable.

McGregor was ordered to pay five percent of his UFC 202 show purse ($150,000) but the commission made a special adjustment which says that $75,000 will be spent on an anti-bullying campaign that McGregor will star in. He also has 50 hours of community service.

I cannot imagine them giving Diaz the same punishment. Can you see Diaz being the spokesman for anything? He isn't exactly the most articulate public speaker.

I also can't see the same punishment for a few other reasons.

For example, the implication from one commissioner that the event was planned by Diaz's crew. He mentions the moment he sees Nick Diaz motion for Nate to leave the stage. Perhaps they will inflict a harsher punishment on Diaz for that reason. No other commissioner commented on this, but it could be debated further when it's Diaz's turn at the podium.

In addition to that, the videos shown at McGregor's hearing (and will likely be shown at Diaz's) reflect that Diaz's camp was the first to throw bottles, thus "starting it."

If Diaz is fined the same amount as McGregor, he would owe $50,000 which pales in comparison to McGregor's $150K, but the commission was adamant about sticking to a percentage fine in order to be fair to each fighter.

McGregor also offered an apology and remorse for the incident, and at least two of the commissioners noted it in their remarks. If Diaz does not do the same, that could (and probably would) be reflected in his punishment.

We've already seen the NAC sentence Nate's brother, Nick, much more harshly than other fighters, but he was a habitual offender and this is Nate's first time in front of the commission, so perhaps they will be more lenient.

I would imagine the commission will punish McGregor and Diaz equally, but if they don't force Diaz to do a PSA, then how will they quantify an equal punishment? Would they increase the monetary fine, or would they increase the community service?

Diaz is set to appear for his hearing in November, so we'll need to wait until then to see what they decide.

What do you think the appropriate punishment should be? What do you think of what McGregor was ordered?